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Help save the important population of White-Clawed Crayfish in North Monaghan. The White-Clawed Crayfish, which looks like a small brown lobster (see picture), lives in our streams and lakes and is a very important part of the food chain. Many fish species, including trout and pike feed on the crayfish and it is an important food source for the Otter. You may be not be aware that Crayfish plague, a disease that badly affects our native White-Clawed Crayfish, was found in the Ulster Blackwater, about 10km from Clogher in mid September this year In order to prevent the spread of this disease we are asking all water users, including anglers, canoeists and anyone who gets their feet wet, to do the following: Check, clean and dry all clothes and equipment after visiting the river / lake. a.       Check for any plant or animals hiding in the bottom of a boat or attached to a boot. Remove and leave at the river where you found them. b.      Clean all equipment with fresh water. c.       Allow equipment to dry for at least 48 hours before using them again. If this isn’t possible, disinfect with Milton or a bleach solution. http://www.biodiversityireland.ie/projects/invasive-species/invasive-species-week/check-clean-dry/ Keep an eye out for any signs of sick or unhealthy crayfish. Crayfish are usually very shy and remain hidden under stones in the river, so are not usually “out and about”. If you see anything which seems odd, please report it directly to the local National Parks and Wildlife Service Conservation Ranger, Jennifer Lynch on 085-8073761.
All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Help save the important population of White- Clawed Crayfish in North Monaghan. The White-Clawed Crayfish, which looks like a small brown lobster (see picture), lives in our streams and lakes and is a very important part of the food chain. Many fish species, including trout and pike feed on the crayfish and it is an important food source for the Otter. You may be not be aware that Crayfish plague, a disease that badly affects our native White- Clawed Crayfish, was found in the Ulster Blackwater, about 10km from Clogher in mid September this year In order to prevent the spread of this disease we are asking all water users, including anglers, canoeists and anyone who gets their feet wet, to do the following: Check, clean and dry all clothes and equipment after visiting the river / lake. a.       Check for any plant or animals hiding in the bottom of a boat or attached to a boot. Remove and leave at the river where you found them. b.      Clean all equipment with fresh water. c.       Allow equipment to dry for at least 48 hours before using them again. If this isn’t possible, disinfect with Milton or a bleach solution. http://www.biodiversityireland.ie/projects/invasive-species/invasive- species-week/check-clean-dry/ Keep an eye out for any signs of sick or unhealthy crayfish. Crayfish are usually very shy and remain hidden under stones in the river, so are not usually “out and about”. If you see anything which seems odd, please report it directly to the local National Parks and Wildlife Service Conservation Ranger, Jennifer Lynch on 085-8073761.