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Ambulance Response to Incident Saturday, September 8th at Tully: The following is a copy of an email which was sent to all Public Representatives re. incident at Tully during a football match. I also included here the response which Senator Robbie Gallagher received from the NAS and my response to that: “Today, Saturday, September 8th the following incident was reported to me: A young girl from Armagh, playing in a football tournament at Emyvale Grounds, Tully, Emyvale, suffered a serious injury and the Red Cross personnel present advised that an ambulance be called. It was called and 40 minutes later an Advanced paramedic in his car arrived from Cavan. He stabilised the patient but needed an ambulance to take her to hospital but he was unable to get an ambulance as none was available. He then arranged for the Red Cross ambulance to take her to Craigavon Hospital. The ambulance departed the scene two and a half hours after the injury occurred. So this is the service we have in North Monaghan. Do we really have to wait for a fatality before we are taken seriously? Do we really have to accept that we live in a wilderness? Do we really have to accept that the people who are making the decisions about our lives and our deaths care about us? Do we really have to accept that we cannot change things? Do we really have to accept that our lives are worth less than those of the people, who have put us in this position? We need protection and we are looking hard”. Response from NAS (National Ambulance Service): The National Ambulance Service (NAS) can confirm an emergency 999/112 call was received at 12.48hrs on the 8th September 2018 for Emyvale GAA Club, Tully Emyvale, Co Monaghan for two 13 year old females had clashed heads. The caller, who was an emergency medical technician, informed the National Emergency Operation Centre (NEOC) emergency call taker the patient was been(sic) treated by the attending event medics (Red Cross) at the time. The call was triaged using the internationally recognised Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS). This system prioritises calls using internationally agreed procedures and protocols thus ensuring that life threatening and potentially life threatening calls receive an appropriate response. The NEOC emergency dispatcher immediately allocated the closest available resource which was an advanced paramedic in a rapid response vehicle (RRV) which arrived at scene at 13.41hrs. The advanced paramedic identified the patients were suitable to be transported to hospital by the Red Cross ambulance and stood down the responding NAS ambulance. My Response to that reply: The call was made at 12.48pm, and 'the closest available resource' took 53 minutes to reach the location of the patient. So if it had been a priority call it would still take them 53 minutes to get there . This implies that the ‘nearest available response’ was 53 minutes from the patient, irrespective of the seriousness of the injury. My information was that at least one of the patients was displaying symptoms of a what could be a serious injury and needed hospital treatment asap. The Red Cross personnel obviously agreed when an ambulance was called even though they had 'treated' the patient. The Advanced Paramedic must also have agreed when he called for an ambulance to take the patient to hospital. If two persons needed hospital treatment then two ambulances would be needed as they can only transport one in each vehicle. So if one or two really needed hospital treatment where was the ambulance? In normal circumstances the Red Cross do not transfer patients to hospital as per protocol but in this case there was no ambulance readily available without a long wait for it to arrive and so in those circumstances the Red Cross was authorised. Where was the 'responding NAS ambulance' when it was stood down? This could have been a disaster and in other circumstances it could have meant a different outcome. Their response therefore is far from satisfactory. Update on Patient: I have been informed that the girl who was injured and taken to hospital is doing well and recovering from arm, shoulder and neck injuries. We send her our best wishes to her for a speedy full recovery and a return to the football field for her club.
All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Ambulance Response to Incident Saturday, September 8th at Tully: The following is a copy of an email which was sent to all Public Representatives re. incident at Tully during a football match. I also included here the response which Senator Robbie Gallagher received from the NAS and my response to that: “Today, Saturday, September 8th the following incident was reported to me: A young girl from Armagh, playing in a football tournament at Emyvale Grounds, Tully, Emyvale, suffered a serious injury and the Red Cross personnel present advised that an ambulance be called. It was called and 40 minutes later an Advanced paramedic in his car arrived from Cavan. He stabilised the patient but needed an ambulance to take her to hospital but he was unable to get an ambulance as none was available. He then arranged for the Red Cross ambulance to take her to Craigavon Hospital. The ambulance departed the scene two and a half hours after the injury occurred. So this is the service we have in North Monaghan. Do we really have to wait for a fatality before we are taken seriously? Do we really have to accept that we live in a wilderness? Do we really have to accept that the people who are making the decisions about our lives and our deaths care about us? Do we really have to accept that we cannot change things? Do we really have to accept that our lives are worth less than those of the people, who have put us in this position? We need protection and we are looking hard”. Response from NAS (National Ambulance Service): The National Ambulance Service (NAS) can confirm an emergency 999/112 call was received at 12.48hrs on the 8th September 2018 for Emyvale GAA Club, Tully Emyvale, Co Monaghan for two 13 year old females had clashed heads. The caller, who was an emergency medical technician, informed the National Emergency Operation Centre (NEOC) emergency call taker the patient was been(sic) treated by the attending event medics (Red Cross) at the time. The call was triaged using the internationally recognised Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS). This system prioritises calls using internationally agreed procedures and protocols thus ensuring that life threatening and potentially life threatening calls receive an appropriate response. The NEOC emergency dispatcher immediately allocated the closest available resource which was an advanced paramedic in a rapid response vehicle (RRV) which arrived at scene at 13.41hrs. The advanced paramedic identified the patients were suitable to be transported to hospital by the Red Cross ambulance and stood down the responding NAS ambulance. My Response to that reply: The call was made at 12.48pm, and 'the closest available resource' took 53 minutes to reach the location of the patient. So if it had been a priority call it would still take them 53 minutes to get there . This implies that the ‘nearest available response’ was 53 minutes from the patient, irrespective of the seriousness of the injury. My information was that at least one of the patients was displaying symptoms of a what could be a serious injury and needed hospital treatment asap. The Red Cross personnel obviously agreed when an ambulance was called even though they had 'treated' the patient. The Advanced Paramedic must also have agreed when he called for an ambulance to take the patient to hospital. If two persons needed hospital treatment then two ambulances would be needed as they can only transport one in each vehicle. So if one or two really needed hospital treatment where was the ambulance? In normal circumstances the Red Cross do not transfer patients to hospital as per protocol but in this case there was no ambulance readily available without a long wait for it to arrive and so in those circumstances the Red Cross was authorised. Where was the 'responding NAS ambulance' when it was stood down? This could have been a disaster and in other circumstances it could have meant a different outcome. Their response therefore is far from satisfactory. Update on Patient: I have been informed that the girl who was injured and taken to hospital is doing well and recovering from arm, shoulder and neck injuries. We send her our best wishes to her for a speedy full recovery and a return to the football field for her club.